Tips for Teaching your Child to Read through Play and Free ABC and Number Printables

Teaching your child how to read and learn their numbers can be such a fun time! Having these Alphabet writing charts and number charts on hand makes it easy for them to have a reference for what they are learning. 

Download at end of post!
number and alphabet writing charts
As I was putting together a 'little menu' of resources for my kindergartner, I focused on including letters and number charts. I was planning on finding some on pinterest and just calling it good. But I really wanted some simple ones and yet colorful. Well, I realized with all the time I could spend looking, I could just make my own probably a lot quicker. 
homeschool menu folders
The menu idea came from my friend over at Simply Wonders and I love them so much already. 
0-99 number charts preschool
Montessori movable alphabet
I'm no expert on teaching a child how to read. There are so many wonderful methods out there, but today I'd thought I'd share just some simple tips on how I have taught all my kids their letters and reading through everyday play. 

Tips for Teaching Your Child How to Read through Play

1. Make it part of every day

This is probably the most important thing you can do. Letters are everywhere and everything (obviously) starts with a letter. You do not need a scheduled time to learn letters, just do it intentionally while playing, driving, shopping or cooking, etc.  

2. Start young 

I don't mean to be a stickler and start formal reading lessons, but as soon as they can recognize what you are saying (around 2), they're ready to learn some letters. Teach them which letter is theirs and move on to letters that belong their parents and siblings. ABC books can also be fun to explore and talk about the letters. Also, start saying the sounds when you say the letters. They might not get the sounds until later, but it doesn't hurt them to hear the sounds. But, remember don't push them, just introduce it to them naturally.  Some kids might not be interested in letters at all, and that's totally fine.  

3. Make it fun and part of play

As you are playing with them (say stuffed animals), point out that a cat starts with a c and if you have paper nearby, draw a c for them. We got bath letters and during bath time we play with each letter and think of animals that start with those letters. 

Other fun play ideas:
  • Paint rocks together with all the letters
  • play matching games with letters and animals/toys/objects in the house
  • play I'm thinking of an animal that starts with (pick a letter sound)
  • As they get older and know more letters sounds, play what letters is the end of this word. 

4. Use a movable alphabets. 

When their really ready to start reading, I suggest getting some type of movable alphabet. I got some capital wooden letters and lower case letters and they were perfect for play and spelling cvc words with my daughter. I let her paint all the vowels and she loved that. Paint the vowels made those letters stand out and easy to find. The movable alphabet is a great way to play while teaching them to read. 

5. Word Study


When they're ready to read words, start with simple cvc words that are similar. Word study is a fun way to engage kids and help them learn to read words that are easy. You can find a great list of word study (for free) at Simple Wonders.

6: Other resources for teaching reading that I LOVE are:

how to teach kids to read

Click below to download the Alphabet Writing Charts and Number Charts Free Printables. They come in color and black and white.


Amazon Resource Pick:

printable writing chart
Alphabet  number charts printables


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